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Our "Don't Miss" Books of 2018 PART 2 with Dr. Debbie Reese and Traci Sorell (The Children's Book Podcast #479)

December 21, 2018

AMERICAN INDIANS IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE FOUNDER AND CYNSATIONS CONTRIBUTOR RECOMMEND...   

 

Dr. Debbie Reese (@debreese) and Traci Sorell (@tracisorell) join on behalf of AMERICAN INDIANS IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE and CYNSATIONS. Dr. Reese writes regularly at AMERICAN INDIANS IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (AICL), which provides critical perspectives and analysis of indigenous peoples in children's and young adult books, the school curriculum, popular culture, and society. Traci Sorell is the author of WE ARE GRATEFUL: OTSALIHELIGA and is a regular contributor to CYNSATIONS, a blog founded by Cynthia Leitich Smith centering on reflective conversations, publishing information, writer insights & inspiration, bookseller-librarian-teacher appreciation, children's-YA literature news & author outreach. I asked Debbie and Traci if they’d like to join me to share those “don’t miss” titles they’ve been recommending to friends, colleagues, and readers of all ages. You’re gonna love watching your TBR pile grow with these fantastic titles!

 

  

ABOUT THE GUESTS:

Debbie is a founding member of the Native American House and American Indian Studies program at the University of Illinois. She is on the Literature Advisory Board for Reading is Fundamental and the Advisory Board for Reach Out and Read American Indian/Alaska Native.

 

Visit American Indians in Children's Literature online at americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com

 

Listen to Dr. Debbie Reese on the Children's Book Podcast (Episode #450)

About AN INDIGENOUS PEOPLES' HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 

 

In response to the growing demand from school teachers, Beacon Press began working with educators and young adult authors to adapt books in the ReVisioning American History series for readers age 12 and up. One of the first titles in the series will be, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People to be published in July 2019. The potential impact of these YA editions could be wide reaching. As one teacher commented, “having accessible editions of these texts impacts not only the way I teach today, but the way I teach for decades to come.”

 

This new version of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States brings a painful but necessary reframing of our history to younger readers and teachers looking to better understand the legacy of Indigenous peoples' resistance, resilience, and continued struggle against imperialism. Going beyond the story of America as a country "discovered" by a few brave men in the "New World," indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler-colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity.

 

The original text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts, Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for readers age 12 and up to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, timelines, a glossary, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students to think critically about their own place in history.

Traci Sorell writes poems, fiction and nonfiction works for children. She is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Traci grew up in northeastern Oklahoma, where her tribe is located.

 

Learn more about Traci Sorell at www.tracisorell.com

 

And purchase any one of Traci's books for you, your readers, a friend, or a library HERE.

 

Listen to Traci Sorell on the Children's Book Podcast (Episode #460)

 

 

SHOW NOTES:

 

 

DEBBIE AND TRACI'S "DON'T MISS" BOOKS: 

Kiss By Kiss/Ocètôwina: A Counting Book For Families by Richard Van Camp and Mary Cardinal Collins

Orca Book Publishers

 

One kiss, two kiss, three kiss, four So many kisses and so many more. From bestselling author Richard Van Camp comes a delightful counting book that honors families and can be used to praise your little ones as they learn to count. Ten kisses from your sweet baby might not be enough to get you through this adorable book, so you'll just have to read it over and overOrca Book Publishers is pleased to offer this book as a dual-language (English/Plains Cree) edition.

 

Chester Nez and the Unbreakable Code: A Navajo Code Talker's Story by Joseph Bruchac and Liz Amini-Holmes

Albert Whitman & Company

 

As a young Navajo boy, Chester Nez had to leave the reservation and attend boarding school, where he was taught that his native language and culture were useless. But Chester refused to give up his heritage. Years later, during World War II, Chester—and other Navajo men like him—was recruited by the US Marines to use the Navajo language to create an unbreakable military code. Suddenly the language he had been told to forget was needed to fight a war. This powerful picture book biography contains back matter including a timeline and a portion of the Navajo code, and also depicts the life of an original Navajo code talker while capturing the importance of heritage.

 

Unstoppable: How Jim Thorpe and the Carlisle Indian School Football Team Defeated Army by Art Coulson and Nick Hardcastle

Capstone Editions

 

In the autumn of 1912, the football team from Carlisle Indian Industrial School took the field at the U.S. Military Academy, home to the bigger, stronger, and better-equipped West Points Cadets. Sportswriters billed the game as a sort of rematch, pitting against each other the descendants of U.S. soldiers and American Indians who fought on the battlefield only 20 years earlier. But for lightning-fast Jim Thorpe and the other Carlisle players, that day's game was about skill, strategy, and determination. Known for unusual formations and innovative plays, the Carlisle squad was out to prove just one thing--that it was the best football team in all the land.

 

Awâsis and the World-Famous Bannock by Dallas Hunt and Amanda Strong

Highwater Press

 

During an unfortunate mishap, young Aw sis loses K hkum's freshly baked world-famous bannock. Not knowing what to do, Aw sis seeks out a variety of other-than-human relatives willing to help. What adventures are in store for Aw sis?

 

 Bowwow Powwow by Brenda J. Child, Jonathan Thunder, and Gordon Jourdain

Minnesota Historical Society Press

 

Windy Girl is blessed with a vivid imagination. From Uncle she gathers stories of long-ago traditions, about dances and sharing and gratitude. Windy can tell such stories herself-about her dog, Itchy Boy, and the way he dances to request a treat and how he wriggles with joy in response to, well, just about everything.

 

When Uncle and Windy Girl and Itchy Boy attend a powwow, Windy watches the dancers and listens to the singers. She eats tasty food and joins family and friends around the campfire. Later, Windy falls asleep under the stars. Now Uncle's stories inspire other visions in her head: a bowwow powwow, where all the dancers are dogs. In these magical scenes, Windy sees veterans in a Grand Entry, and a visiting drum group, and traditional dancers, grass dancers, and jingle-dress dancers-all with telltale ears and paws and tails. All celebrating in song and dance. All attesting to the wonder of the powwow.

 

This playful story by Brenda Child is accompanied by a companion retelling in Ojibwe by Gordon Jourdain and brought to life by Jonathan Thunder's vibrant dreamscapes. The result is a powwow tale for the ages.

 

First Laugh--Welcome, Baby! by Rose Ann Tahe, Nancy Bo Flood, and Jonathan Nelson

Charlesbridge

 

In Navajo families, the first person to make a new baby laugh hosts the child's First Laugh Ceremony. Who will earn the honor in this story?

 

The First Laugh Ceremony is a celebration held to welcome a new member of the community. As everyone--from Baby's nima (mom) to nadi (big sister) to cheii (grandfather)--tries to elicit the joyous sound from Baby, readers are introduced to details about Navajo life and the Navajo names for family members. Back matter includes information about other cultural ceremonies that welcome new babies and children, including man yue celebration (China), sanskaras (Hindu) and aquiqa (Muslim).

 

We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices by Wade Hudson (Editor) and Cheryl Willis Hudson (Editor)

Crown Books for Young Readers

 

 "Tell It in Your Own Way" by Joy Boney Jr

 

Fifty of the foremost diverse children's authors and illustrators--including Jason Reynolds, Jacqueline Woodson, and Kwame Alexander--share answers to the question, "In this divisive world, what shall we tell our children?" in this beautiful, full-color keepsake collection, published in partnership with Just Us Books.

 

 

When a Ghost Talks, Listen: A Choctaw Trail of Tears Story (How I Became a Ghost #2) by Tim Tingle

Roadrunner Press

 

Issac and his comrades learn they can time travel, and they head back in time to the Washington, D.C., of 1824 to bear witness for Pushmataha who has come to the nation's capital at the invitation of his dear friend Andrew Jackson.

 

Sasquatch and the Muckleshoot (The Unicorn Rescue Society #3) (Hardcover) by Adam Gidwitz, Joseph Bruchac, and Hatem Aly

Dutton Books for Young Readers

 

Among the towering fir trees of the Pacific Northwest, a famously elusive creature is in serious trouble. All Elliot wants is a nice, normal day at school.

 

All Uchenna wants is an adventure. Guess whose wish comes true?

 

Professor Fauna whisks the kids—and Jersey, of course—off to the Muckleshoot territory in Washington, where film crews have suddenly descended en masse to expose Bigfoot to the world, and the Schmoke logging company is bringing in some awfully large machinery.

 

Can the Unicorn Rescue Society escape the blades of the Schmokes’ chain saws? Outsmart a cable news team? And are those big, hairy creatures running through the forest really Bigfoot?

 

Hearts Unbroken by Cynthia Leitich Smith

Candlewick

 

New York Times best-selling author Cynthia Leitich Smith turns to realistic fiction with the thoughtful story of a Native teen navigating the complicated, confusing waters of high school — and first love.

 

When Louise Wolfe’s first real boyfriend mocks and disrespects Native people in front of her, she breaks things off and dumps him over e-mail. It’s her senior year, anyway, and she’d rather spend her time with her family and friends and working on the school newspaper. The editors pair her up with Joey Kairouz, the ambitious new photojournalist, and in no time the paper’s staff find themselves with a major story to cover: the school musical director’s inclusive approach to casting The Wizard of Oz has been provoking backlash in their mostly white, middle-class Kansas town. From the newly formed Parents Against Revisionist Theater to anonymous threats, long-held prejudices are being laid bare and hostilities are spreading against teachers, parents, and students — especially the cast members at the center of the controversy, including Lou’s little brother, who’s playing the Tin Man. As tensions mount at school, so does a romance between Lou and Joey — but as she’s learned, “dating while Native” can be difficult. In trying to protect her own heart, will Lou break Joey’s?

 

Give Me Some Truth by Eric Gansworth

Arthur A. Levine Books

 

Carson Mastick is entering his senior year of high school and desperate to make his mark, on the reservation and off. A rock band -- and winning Battle of the Bands -- is his best shot. But things keep getting in the way. Small matters like the lack of an actual band, or his brother getting shot by the racist owner of a local restaurant.

 

Maggi Bokoni has just moved back to the reservation with her family. She's dying to stop making the same traditional artwork her family sells to tourists (conceptual stuff is cooler), stop feeling out of place in her new (old) home, and stop being treated like a child. She might like to fall in love for the first time too.

 

Carson and Maggi -- along with their friend Lewis -- will navigate loud protests, even louder music, and first love in this stirring novel about coming together in a world defined by difference.

 

New Poets of Native Nations by Heid E. Erdrich

Graywolf Press

 

A landmark anthology celebrating twenty-one Native poets first published in the twenty-first century

 

New Poets of Native Nations gathers poets of diverse ages, styles, languages, and tribal affiliations to present the extraordinary range and power of new Native poetry. Heid E. Erdrich has selected twenty-one poets whose first books were published after the year 2000 to highlight the exciting works coming up after Joy Harjo and Sherman Alexie. Collected here are poems of great breadth—long narratives, political outcries, experimental works, and traditional lyrics—and the result is an essential anthology of some of the best poets writing now.

 

Poets included are Tacey M. Atsitty, Trevino L. Brings Plenty, Julian Talamantez Brolaski, Laura Da’, Natalie Diaz, Jennifer Elise Foerster, Eric Gansworth, Gordon Henry, Jr., Sy Hoahwah, LeAnne Howe, Layli Long Soldier, Janet McAdams, Brandy Nalani McDougall, Margaret Noodin, dg okpik, Craig Santos Perez, Tommy Pico, Cedar Sigo, M. L. Smoker, Gwen Westerman, and Karenne Wood.

*This post contains affiliate links. Any purchases made through these links will support the costs of maintaining the podcast, webcomic, and other materials associated with this site. 

 

 

SHOUT OUT TO OUR PATRONS!

 

Thank you, JENNY SUE, AMY, SARA, KATE, LISA, DARSHANA, MARIANNE, JARRETT, ANITRA, MIKE, LYNN, LINK, CORRINA, CYNTHIA, ELAINE, DOUG, JUDI, AMANDA, RUTH, LARA, TERESA, and others who are coming with me on this journey. You’re welcome to join us. Just visit Patreon.com/matthewcwinner and pick the support tier that’s right for you. All the hugs and high fives for all of the many, many ways all of out there listening support this show.

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